Posts

Five Women Artists in the Collection: Lesley Dill

The Whatcom Museum is featuring five women artists from its collection throughout the month of March—Women’s History Month—in conjunction with the #5WomenArtists campaign, organized by the National Museum of Women in the Arts. The Museum highlights women artists whose artwork spans a variety of media, genres, and eras. We hope you will share our #5WomenArtists on social media, and celebrate the important contributions these women have made to the arts.

Lesley Dill; Shimmer, 2005 – 2006; Wire, metal foil, 12 ft. x 60 ft. x 15 ft. Whatcom Museum # 2015.17.1

Lesley Dill
Shimmer, 2005 – 2006
Wire, metal foil
12 ft. x 60 ft. x 15 ft.
Whatcom Museum # 2015.17.1

The work of contemporary American artist Lesley Dill combines imagery and language, fine art and poetry, and allegory and metaphor throughout her body of work. In this piece, entitled Shimmer (2005 – 2006), Dill uses metal and wire to create an allegorical sculpture that resembles human hair and incorporates imagery and poetry. The piece emerges from a body of work that explores the motif of waterfalls using materials such as wire thread, gauze, cut metal figures, and words that stretch across and down a wall.

Composed of two million, one hundred, ninety thousand feet of fine wire, Shimmer was originally inspired by the dazzling reflection of light on the Atlantic Ocean. Forming an immense, silvery curtain, a 60-foot-cascade descends from a fragment of a mystical poem by the Catalan poet Salvador Espriu (1913 – 1985):

“You may laugh, but I feel

within me, suddenly, strange

voices of God and handles,

dog’s thirst and message of

slow memories that disappear across a fragile

bridge.”

Artist Lesley Dill.

Nature and the divine mingle in the artist’s work, as does the link of the human form to nature. Dill fashions tiny foil figures that cavort among words of poetry spread across the wiry “falls” that stretch downward. Dill notes, “In its silver, Rapunzel-like way, Shimmer, the sixth and last in a series, emerged from decades of making white thread water fall pieces…it captures light, not gravity-bound, implies energy, and feminine virility-like hair.”

Shimmer was exhibited at the Museum’s Lightcatcher building in the show, Lesley Dill’s Poetic Vision: From Shimmer to Sister Gertrude Morgan, October 23, 2011 – March 4, 2012 and was curated by Barbara Matilsky. Learn more about this exhibition and read the Lesley Dill Exhibition Catalog.

About Lesley Dill:
Born and raised in Maine, Dill received her Master of Arts from Smith College in 1974, and her Master of Fine Arts from Maryland Institute College of Art in 1980. In pursuit of a career in painting, the artist moved to New York after graduation. Her eyes were opened to new modes of expression and she soon emerged prominently as a sculptor and multi-media artist. Her interest in language and allusions to strong feminine identity reflect her friendship with the late artist, Nancy Spero (1926 – 2009), who used text and depictions of the female form, often appropriated as classical goddesses, in her scroll paintings. Dill’s artworks are in the collections of more than fifty museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. The artist lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Museum Employee and Professional Artist David Miller Brings Prehistoric Creatures to Life

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

David W. Miller, American, b. 1957; Quetzalcoatlus, 2002; Oil and acrylic on illustration board, 16 x 12 in. Courtesy of the New York State Museum, Albany.

On a Thursday afternoon in October David Miller, the Museum’s Preparator, sat at his desk in the attic of Old City Hall and thumbed through the many binders full of his old paintings.

He was in search of a piece he had created many years ago. With each turned page he uncovered a new prehistoric creature like some sort of artistic archeologist. Every so often he would come across a work that piqued his interest and he would make a quick comment or two about its history.

Finally, he came across the piece he was looking for. It depicted the prehistoric flying beast Quetzalcoatlus as it soared above a North American forest millions of years ago. The piece, titled Quetzalcoatlus after the creature it depicts, was notable because one block away a reproduction was on display at the Lightcatcher building as part of the Museum’s exhibition Endangered Species: Artists on the Frontline of Biodiversity.

“I think it’s an effective drawing. The forced perspective re ally shows you the immensity of the creature,” Miller said as he mused over the piece. Getting the immensity of the creature was essential. Quetzalcoatlus, with an imposing 52-foot wingspan, was the largest flying animal to ever exist, after all.

Miller originally painted Quetzalcoatlus in 2002 for a book on Pterosaurs. The painting ultimately didn’t get published, however. In 2004 he took the piece to the Paleo Art Show at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, and the piece was awarded Best 2D Artwork.

Quetzalcoatlus isn’t Miller’s only painting depicting a dinosaur. In fact, much of his career as a professional artist has been centered around creating scientifically-accurate depictions of prehistoric animals. Read more

Madeline von Foerster: Painting Humanity’s Role in Species Destruction

Madeline von Foerster stands next to her painting, Carnival Insectivora, during the opening ceremony of Endangered Species: Artists on the Front Line of Biodiversity.

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

 

In fourth grade, Madeline von Foerster was asked to do a report on an animal for class. She opted to do her report on an extinct animal. At the time she was also developing a passion for art. With those two facts in mind, it’s no surprise that many years later she would be creating art that highlights the plight of endangered and extinct animals.

Von Foerster has built a career out of commenting on the role humanity plays in the destruction of animal species through her paintings. Two of her paintings, Carnival Insectivora and Reliquary for Rabb’s Frog, can be found in the Museum’s exhibition Endangered Species: Artists on the Front Line of Biodiversity, now showing at the Lightcatcher building.

Carnival Insectivora highlights endangerment of the infamous Venus flytrap, and Reliquary for Rabb’s Frog highlights the extinction of the Rabbs’ fringe-limbed treefrog.

“In both cases, I wanted to create a tribute or a shrine to threatened or extinct species, and also address humanity’s role in their fate,” von Foerster said in an interview with the Museum. Read more

5 Women Artists in the Whatcom Museum’s Collection: Dale Gottlieb

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Dale Gottlieb; Tuskegee Airmen, 1995; Hand-knotted wool rug, 8 x 5 ft. Purchased with funds donated by Chuck and Dee Robinson, WM #2004.28.1

Inspired by the National Museum of Women in the Arts’ challenge, “Can you name five women artists?” the Whatcom Museum is continuing the tradition it started last year and highlighting five female artists whose work is featured in our collection throughout the month of March—Women’s History Month. Follow us on social media and share our posts with your followers, or tell us your favorite women artists. Don’t forget to tag your posts #5WomenArtists.

Artist #4: Dale Gottlieb

Dale Gottlieb was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1952. From an early age she was frequently exposed to the art world. Almost every Saturday morning she would go to the Brooklyn Museum of Art. It was at this museum that Gottlieb became heavily inspired by African art. She also drew inspiration from her environment growing up. Raised in Brooklyn during the 1950s, Gottlieb was constantly surrounded by people from a diverse range of religious beliefs, races, and sexual orientations.

Up until the 8th grade, she attended Brooklyn’s Ethical Culture School. This alternative school emphasized a curriculum based on philosophy and humanitarianism.

Gottlieb attended the School of Art and Design at Alfred University, in New York, in the 70s. At the age of 20, she postponed her studies for a couple of months to travel to India and stay at a Hindu ashram. While in India, she was deeply touched by the spiritual rituals and considered staying in India, but eventually decided that continuing her work as an artist was her true calling. She returned to Alfred University and finished her degree with honors in 1975.  Read more

5 Women Artists in the Whatcom Museum’s Collection: Doris Totten Chase

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Inspired by the National Museum of Women in the Arts’ challenge, “Can you name five women artists?” the Whatcom Museum is continuing the tradition it started last year and highlighting five female artists whose work is featured in our collection throughout the month of March—Women’s History Month. Follow us on social media and share our posts with your followers, or tell us your favorite women artists. Don’t forget to tag your posts #5WomenArtists.

Doris Totten Chase; Sun Disc, 1980; Silkscreen print, 22 x 30 in. Gift of Doris Totten Chase, Whatcom Museum # 2003.51.12.

Artist #3: Doris Totten Chase 

Doris Totten Chase was an influential figure in early computer-generated art. Her early experimentations helped defined the future of the medium and expressed themes about the lives of women.

Chase was born in Seattle on April 29, 1923. In 1941 she graduated from Roosevelt High School and began to study architecture at the University of Washington. It wasn’t long after this that she met Elmo Chase, a lieutenant in the US Navy, and dropped out in 1943.

Chase’s introduction to the art world came after the birth of her first child. After suffering from an emotional breakdown, Chase decided to explore new interests and discovered a talent for painting.

She originally studied oil panting under prominent Northwest artists like Jacob Elshin, Nickolas Damascus, and Mark Tobey. She found her first success in 1948 when one of her paintings was accepted into the Seattle Art Museum’s Northwest Annual Exhibition.

Chase continued to work in the Pacific Northwest and make a name for herself, coming up against many biases that affected Northwest women artists at the time. Gradually, she shifted mediums, going from oil painting to cement work to outdoor sculptures. Her artwork began to include interactive elements that invited viewers to move the art around for further exploration. One of her more recognized pieces was the sculpture Changing Form, in Kerry Park on Queen Anne Hill in Seattle. The sculpture, which was made at a time when sculpting was considered a man’s art, became one of Seattle’s most widely recognized pieces of art. Read more

5 Women Artists in the Whatcom Museum’s Collection: Maria Frank Abrams

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Inspired by the National Museum of Women in the Arts’ challenge, “Can you name five women artists?” the Whatcom Museum is continuing the tradition it started last year and highlighting five female artists whose work is featured in our collection throughout the month of March—Women’s History Month. Follow us on social media and share our posts with your followers, or tell us your favorite women artists. Don’t forget to tag your posts #5WomenArtists.

Artist #2: Maria Frank Abrams

Maria Frank Abrams, (1924-2013); Untitled, 1977; Graphite on paper, 13.25 x 21.25 in. Whatcom Museum #2008.78.3. Gift of the artist.

Maria Frank Abrams’ life was one of tragedy, perseverance, and beauty. Her powerful paintings were seen by people around the world and touched the hearts of those in the Pacific Northwest

Born in 1924 to a Jewish family, Abrams grew up in Debrecen, Hungary. At five years old, she began to paint. However, her life was forever changed when, at the age of 19, her family was taken to the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in Poland in 1944.

According to the Washington Jewish Museum, during her time in the concentration camp, Abrams was able to find pencils and paper, and women in the camp would ask her to draw what they looked like before the war. From this experience, she said she was able to find some sort of reality in the “unreal tortured world that we lived in.” By the end of the war, she had lost 33 relatives; only one cousin had survived. Read more

Holiday Shopping at the Museum Store

Boxed card sets by MoMA and Pomegranate.

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

With the holidays quickly approaching, you may be wondering what gifts you’re going to give your friends and family this year. Look no further than the Whatcom Museum’s Store inside the Lightcatcher building. The Museum Store has an assortment of items to fit anyone’s tastes and budget. Here are a variety of featured items you should consider for your next holiday gifts. Members receive 10% off purchase, and don’t forget, memberships make great gifts, too!  Read more

A Closer Look at Art of the American West

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

When you first walk into Art of the American West: Highlights of the Haub Family Collection from the Tacoma Art Museum at the Lightcatcher building, you’re met with a brilliant, colorful painting depicting a Native American man. As you look to your left, your gaze falls upon a portrait of another Native American man painted in 1851 by Paul Kane. But if you look more closely at this painting something else may catch your gaze: two large medals that are affixed to the sash on the chief.

A patron looks at “Portrait of Maungwudaus,” c.1851 by Paul Kane (1810-1871). Oil on canvas, 30 x 25 in. Courtesy of the Tacoma Art Museum, Haub Family Collection, Gift of Erivan and Helga Haub.

This seems like a peculiar sight. “Medals?” You may ask. “What are these medals for and who awarded them?” The answers to these questions are quite interesting.

The man depicted in this painting is Maungwudaus, meaning the great “hero” or “courageous,” (known by his English name, George Henry). Maungwudaus was born circa 1807 on the northwest shore of Lake Ontario and was an Ojibwa interpreter, performer, and Methodist mission worker. In 1844 he formed a travelling Native American dance troupe, which included members of his own family and several Walpole Island Ojibwa. They traveled to Britain, France and Eastern North America to perform, and the show gained quite the reputation. Maungwudaus had the opportunity to perform for royalty such as the Duke of Wellington, King Louis Philippe of France and the king and queen of Belgium. The group continued to perform for several years in Canada and the US after leaving Europe.

Read more

Making Faces: Masks and Masquerading Around the World

By Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

Author Marty Rubin once said that, “behind every mask there is a face, and behind that a story.” These stories allow us to see the world in a better light. The Whatcom Museum invites you to join us as we explore masks and the stories behind them.

Masks carved by Native American artists from the Northwest will also be on display, presenting a

Tsonokwa Mask, carved by Scott Jensen

modern take on traditional masks from tribes around the region. At the event, you can learn how Pacific Northwest tribes used masks in their celebratory and religious ceremonies. Guests will also be able to try on several hands-on masks made in traditional Northwest Coast Native styles and make their own three-dimensional masks.

“Masks have played an important role in many tribal traditions throughout the world. They’re used for so many things, from ceremonies to ensure a good harvest or successful hunts and fishing,  to scaring away demons and curing illness. For some northernmost Native American tribes, masks hold sacred meaning and are used to convey ancient stories.” said Susanna Brooks, the Director of Learning Innovation at Whatcom Museum.

Read more

Transcending Boundaries: Becoming Helmi

The Whatcom Museum’s online virtual exhibitions feature a variety of historic photographs, artwork, and ephemera that visitors can view at their leisure. Recently, the Museum has uploaded a new virtual gallery that showcases a sampling of artwork by Helmi Juvonen (1903-1985), which can be viewed HERE. Scroll down to learn more about the life Helmi.

Helmi Juvonen, Vantage, circa 1975-1976;
Gouache on rice paper. Gift of Dr. Ulrich & Stella Fritzsche.

Transcending Boundaries: Becoming Helmi

Helmi Dagmar Juvonen (1903-1985) was a Seattle-based artist who found success capturing the culture of Native American tribes across the Pacific Northwest. She was a persistent artist who strived to create art in a time where being a female artist was tough. Even as she struggled with poverty and mental illness, Helmi continued to create art until her final days.

Finding Her Love and Audience

Born in Butte Montana in 1903, Helmi found her love of art at a young age from her father, a Finnish immigrant, who made pencil sketches and watercolor paintings for her and her sister. When she was 15, her family moved to Seattle. During the time that she attended Queen Anne High School, Helmi sold handmade rag dolls and greeting cards at a local department store.

After graduating high school, she worked as a seamstress for a local company and took on small side jobs to pay her way through art school at Seattle Art School. Through these side jobs, Helmi established a line of connections that included affluent citizens and successful artists. In 1929, through one of these connections, Helmi got a scholarship to attended Cornish School (now Cornish College of the Arts) in 1929 where she studied puppetry and lithography. In 1930 she was hospitalized with manic-depressive illness (now known as bipolar disorder) and spent three years at Northern State Hospital.

Read more

Events

FIG Studio: Sea Stars

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 26-30: Sea Stars

Sea stars come in all shapes and sizes and this week you can design your own using different colored tissue paper.

FIG Studio: Sea Stars

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 26-30: Sea Stars

Sea stars come in all shapes and sizes and this week you can design your own using different colored tissue paper.

FIG Studio: Sea Stars

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 26-30: Sea Stars

Sea stars come in all shapes and sizes and this week you can design your own using different colored tissue paper.

FIG Studio: Sea Stars

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 26-30: Sea Stars

Sea stars come in all shapes and sizes and this week you can design your own using different colored tissue paper.

FIG Studio: Sea Stars

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 26-30: Sea Stars

Sea stars come in all shapes and sizes and this week you can design your own using different colored tissue paper.

FIG Studio: Orcas

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 19-23: Orcas

What do whales like to chew? Blubber gum! This week we will be having a whale of a time making paper Orcas.

FIG Studio: Orcas

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 19-23: Orcas

What do whales like to chew? Blubber gum! This week we will be having a whale of a time making paper Orcas.

FIG Studio: Orcas

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 19-23: Orcas

What do whales like to chew? Blubber gum! This week we will be having a whale of a time making paper Orcas.

FIG Studio: Orcas

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 19-23: Orcas

What do whales like to chew? Blubber gum! This week we will be having a whale of a time making paper Orcas.

FIG Studio: Orcas

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 19-23: Orcas

What do whales like to chew? Blubber gum! This week we will be having a whale of a time making paper Orcas.

FIG Studio: Picture Frame for Dad

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 12-16: Picture Frame for Dad

Father’s Day is this Sunday! We will be making a special gift for Dad this week. Bring in a picture of yourself if you want to add a personal touch to your art.

FIG Studio: Picture Frame for Dad

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 12-16: Picture Frame for Dad

Father’s Day is this Sunday! We will be making a special gift for Dad this week. Bring in a picture of yourself if you want to add a personal touch to your art.

FIG Studio: Picture Frame for Dad

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 12-16: Picture Frame for Dad

Father’s Day is this Sunday! We will be making a special gift for Dad this week. Bring in a picture of yourself if you want to add a personal touch to your art.

FIG Studio: Picture Frame for Dad

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 12-16: Picture Frame for Dad

Father’s Day is this Sunday! We will be making a special gift for Dad this week. Bring in a picture of yourself if you want to add a personal touch to your art.

FIG Studio: Picture Frame for Dad

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 12-16: Picture Frame for Dad

Father’s Day is this Sunday! We will be making a special gift for Dad this week. Bring in a picture of yourself if you want to add a personal touch to your art.

FIG Studio: Crabs

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 5-9: Crabs

Can a paper plate become a crab shell? Find out this week in the FIG Studio, where you can make a crabby friend to take home.

FIG Studio: Crabs

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 5-9: Crabs

Can a paper plate become a crab shell? Find out this week in the FIG Studio, where you can make a crabby friend to take home.

FIG Studio: Crabs

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 5-9: Crabs

Can a paper plate become a crab shell? Find out this week in the FIG Studio, where you can make a crabby friend to take home.

FIG Studio: Crabs

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 5-9: Crabs

Can a paper plate become a crab shell? Find out this week in the FIG Studio, where you can make a crabby friend to take home.

FIG Studio: Crabs

A self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

June 5-9: Crabs

Can a paper plate become a crab shell? Find out this week in the FIG Studio, where you can make a crabby friend to take home.

FIG Studio: Bees

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 29-June 2:  Bees

Buzz on over to make a sweet paper bumblebee, complete with googly eyes!

 

FIG Studio: Bees

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 29-June 2:  Bees

Buzz on over to make a sweet paper bumblebee, complete with googly eyes!

 

FIG Studio: Bees

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 29-June 2:  Bees

Buzz on over to make a sweet paper bumblebee, complete with googly eyes!

 

FIG Studio: Bees

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 29-June 2:  Bees

Buzz on over to make a sweet paper bumblebee, complete with googly eyes!

 

FIG Studio: Bees

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 29-June 2:  Bees

Buzz on over to make a sweet paper bumblebee, complete with googly eyes!

 

FIG Studio: Ladybugs

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 22-26: Ladybugs

Are all ladybugs female? Are they all red? This week we will find out, while making our own ladybug to take home.

FIG Studio: Ladybugs

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 22-26: Ladybugs

Are all ladybugs female? Are they all red? This week we will find out, while making our own ladybug to take home.

FIG Studio: Ladybugs

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 22-26: Ladybugs

Are all ladybugs female? Are they all red? This week we will find out, while making our own ladybug to take home.

FIG Studio: Ladybugs

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 22-26: Ladybugs

Are all ladybugs female? Are they all red? This week we will find out, while making our own ladybug to take home.

FIG Studio: Ladybugs

The FIG Studio is a self-guided, self-exploratory play-to-learn, make-and-take space for young inquisitive minds to imagine, create, and innovate. Perfect for all ages. The Studio is open for free-creation and sensory exploration, and our supply bins are stocked with plenty of materials!

May 22-26: Ladybugs

Are all ladybugs female? Are they all red? This week we will find out, while making our own ladybug to take home.