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Guests read about the Hall of Birds

Community Partnership: Audubon Society

Sometimes two organizations come together to better achieve their missions. The Whatcom Museum and the North Cascades Audubon Society (NCAS) are an example of this. Through an ongoing partnership, the Museum and Audubon Society have produced a variety of events, and an exhibit, that have informed and inspired people throughout Whatcom County.

Museum and Audubon Society form partnership

The partnership began in 2013 when the Museum opened an exhibit in the Syre Education Center that showcased its collection of taxidermy birds and Native American artifacts on a limited basis. Shortly after the exhibit opened, Museum staff invited NCAS to help assist with programs about the birds. NCAS agreed, and representatives spent time each month volunteering in the exhibit to answer questions.

A collage of birds set up in the “John Eden Hall of Birds” exhibit.

Then the Museum decided to move its founding collection of taxidermy birds from the Syre to Old City Hall in 2016-17 to create the John M. Edson Hall of Birds. The North Cascades Audubon Society played a key role in the exhibit development.

“When planning began for moving the birds to Old City Hall, knowledgeable NCAS birders joined in and we discussed key birds to move and important themes for the exhibit. These became foundational to the new exhibit,” said Chris Brewer, a previous Museum educator involved in getting the Audubon active at the Museum.

The Hall of Birds showcases more than 500 mounted birds and helps visitors learn about migration, conservation, and more. The North Cascades Audubon Society is still involved with the Hall of Birds exhibit. Every fourth Sunday of the month from 1:30-3:30pm is Audubon at the Museum. There, volunteer experts from the Audubon Society answer questions about the exhibit and birds in general.

Beyond the Hall of Birds

The North Cascades Audubon Society holds monthly meetings in the Rotunda Room of Old City Hall. Educational presentations are on the fourth Tuesday of every month. The programs are open to the public and highlight a diverse range of topics.

NCAS has also been a key financial contributor to many of the Museum’s programs. It helped fund four summer camps in 2015 and 2016, providing scholarships for four children as well as purchasing materials. NCAS also co-sponsored two presentations by well-known bird photographer Paul Bannick. During the Vanishing Ice exhibition in 2013-14, NCAS helped facilitate family educational events.

The Audubon Society does a lot of work for the community outside of the Museum. It continues to support scientific research about local wildlife and the environment. It has also provided grants for more than 30 college students who have completed work on 31 research projects. NCAS also served as Whatcom County Coordinator for a five-year, state-wide study on seabird mortality. Through all of these actions, the Audubon Society continues to provide opportunities for the public to engage with the natural world.

“Audubon is not only a birding organization, but an educational and conservation oriented [organization] as well,” said Pam Borso, current president of the North Cascades Audubon Society. “The Museum has provided us the opportunity to further our presence in the community.”

The Whatcom Museum thanks the North Cascades Audubon Society for their contribution to the community, and to our visitors.

–Written by Colton Redtfeldt, Marketing Assistant

 

Events

yellow birds being displayed

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

Join experts from the North Cascades Audubon Society in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to learn about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and the importance of studying bird specimens today. The exhibit provides a variety of interactives, including video and audio files, and hands-on activities for children. All ages welcome. This is a drop-in event.

collection of birds being displayed in behind a glass partition

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

Join experts from the North Cascades Audubon Society in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to learn about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and the importance of studying bird specimens today. The exhibit provides a variety of interactives, including video and audio files, and hands-on activities for children. All ages welcome.

yellow birds being displayed

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

Drop-in to Old City Hall to learn about birds! A volunteer from the North Cascades Audubon Society will be on hand in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to answer questions about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and more. All ages welcome.

Included with admission/Members free

woman showing a small group of people a small bird

Audubon: Birds of the Amazon

Join the North Cascades Audubon Society for their monthly program in the Rotunda Room of Old City Hall. The Peruvian Amazonia is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world, and thousands of species are distributed in this region. Unfortunately, many bird species and their habitats in the region have been affected by deforestation, agriculture expansion, and illegal mining. Dr. Ursula Valdez and her colleagues assess the bird populations, their distribution among available habitats, and the related impacts of human activities. Dr. Valdez will share some of her research findings, and she will explain how these studies are also helping to engage people from Peru and other regions in science, conservation, education, and sustainability.

Dr. Valdez is a Peruvian-American Avian tropical ecologist and conservationist. She focuses on studies of bird community ecology, habitat use and works in conservation programs in the SE Peruvian Amazon. She collaborates with other scientists and professionals and local communities of Madre de Dios to develop conservation programs. At UW Bothell, through her courses, and field study abroad to Peru, she offers opportunities to connect her students with a body of local and international researchers, conservation organizations and students working on ecology, natural history field research and conservation.

$5 Suggested donation/Members free

The Audubon will no longer require proof of vaccination or masks to attend this program in-person. The Museum strongly encourages wearing masks throughout the campus and if you feel unwell or have any symptoms of illness, please tune in virtually to the program on the Museum’s YouTube channel.

 

Pileated woodpecker with a red head, black and white striped face, and black body resting on the branch of a tree with green leaves around it

Audubon: Birds Tell Us

Join us to hear from Deborah Jensen, PhD, the executive director of Audubon Washington, as she shares insights from the state’s National Audubon Society office and its 25 affiliated chapters. Working together to conserve birds and their habitat, Audubon Washington’s current priorities are on coasts, especially Puget Sound, climate policy and smart energy siting, shrub-steppe ecosystems of Eastern Washington, and Seward Park Audubon Center programs that serve the diverse needs of the community through science, outdoor exploration, and education. Image credit: Pileated Woodpecker, Audubon Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary; Collier county, Florida. Photo by John Troth.

$5 suggested donation/members free

The Audubon will no longer require proof of vaccination or masks to attend this program in-person. The Museum strongly encourages wearing masks throughout the campus and if you feel unwell or have any symptoms of illness, please tune in virtually to the program.

COVID-19 Disclaimer: While the Whatcom Museum has implemented rigorous protocols to maintain a clean and safe environment, an inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. COVID-19 is a very contagious disease that can lead to severe illness and death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, senior citizens and visitors with underlying medical conditions are especially vulnerable. By visiting the Whatcom Museum you, and all members of your group, voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Beaver on logs

Audubon: The Surprising, Secret Lives of Beavers and Why They Matter

Environmental journalist Ben Goldfarb reveals how our conception of a healthy ecosystem is wrong, distorted by the fur trade that trapped out millions of beavers from North America’s waterways. The consequences of losing beavers were profound: ponds drained, wetlands dried up, and species from salmon to swans lost vital habitat.

Today, a coalition of “Beaver Believers” recognize that ecosystems with beavers are far healthier than those without them. Believers are hard at work restoring these rodents to their former haunts. In his talk, Ben will discuss how beavers can help us fight drought, flooding, wildfire, and climate change; and how we can coexist with this vital rodent.

Note: This program has been changed to March 29th instead of March 22nd. Also, due to recent COVID rates, the Audubon will host this program virtually via Zoom.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

 

Stuffed birds with a nest of eggs

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

A volunteer from the North Cascades Audubon Society will be on hand in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to answer questions about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and the importance of studying bird specimens today. All ages welcome.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Stuffed birds with a nest of eggs

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

A volunteer from the North Cascades Audubon Society will be on hand in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to answer questions about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and the importance of studying bird specimens today. All ages welcome.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Stuffed birds with a nest of eggs

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

A volunteer from the North Cascades Audubon Society will be on hand in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to answer questions about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and the importance of studying bird specimens today. All ages welcome.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Man with a woodpecker resting on his hand

Audubon: Reproductive Ecology of the White-Headed Woodpecker in Washington’s Ponderosa Pine Forests

In Washington, the White-headed Woodpecker is listed as a species of  concern due to its association with old-growth ponderosa pine forests. Although White-headed Woodpeckers have recently been documented inhabiting early to mid-seral managed forests, information is limited regarding their reproductive success and general ecology in these forests.

For the last 18 years, Jeff Kozma, wildlife biologist for the Yakama Nation, has been studying the ecology of White-headed Woodpeckers in managed ponderosa pine forests of the eastern Cascades. Jeff will present highlights research including nest-site characteristics, reproductive success, nestling provisioning (i.e., who feeds the kids and what are they feeding them) and adult longevity.

Note: Due to recent COVID rates, the Audubon will host this program virtually via Zoom. 


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Man releasing fisher from a crate

Audubon: Wildlife Research and Monitoring in the North Cascades National Park Service Complex

Dr. Jason Ransom will present an overview of wildlife research, monitoring, and conservation efforts currently happening  in North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake National Recreation Area, and Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. The wide array of projects presented will include long-term bird monitoring and trends, Clark’s Nutcracker and whitebark pine mutualism, raptor nesting, hoary marmot and American pika ecology, fisher reintroduction, gray wolf re-establishment, and mountain carnivore diet and ecology.

$5 suggested donation/members free

Note: Due to recent COVID rates, the Audubon will host this program virtually via Zoom. 

 


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Bird with nest and eggs

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

A volunteer from the North Cascades Audubon Society will be on hand in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to answer questions about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and more. All ages welcome.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Audubon: Learn about Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association & Whatcom Land Trust

Join the North Cascades Audubon Society for their monthly program in the Rotunda Room of Old City Hall. The Audubon will offer both an in-person event, as well as a virtual option. Alex Jeffers from the Whatcom Land Trust and Rachel Vasak from the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association will discuss their efforts to acquire, restore, and steward high quality habitat throughout Whatcom County for a multitude of fish and wildlife species, including birds.

They will provide examples of how partnerships, community-supported efforts, and science-based data have improved habitat quality for future generations and how volunteers can be involved in ongoing and future efforts. Their focus on riparian habitat is especially crucial for supporting and protecting the most diverse bird communities in the Pacific Northwest.

Cost: $5 suggested donation/members free

In-person programs in the Rotunda Room of Old City Hall will have distanced seating with a maximum capacity of 60 people on a first come, first serve basis. We will also provide a link to our livestreamed program for viewing offsite. Masks will be required for all participants regardless of vaccination status. If you feel unwell or have any symptoms of illness, please tune in virtually to our programs.

The Audubon will require proof of vaccination to attend this program. Please bring your vaccination card or a photo of it.

 

COVID-19 Disclaimer: While the Whatcom Museum has implemented rigorous protocols to maintain a clean and safe environment, an inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. COVID-19 is a very contagious disease that can lead to severe illness and death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, senior citizens and visitors with underlying medical conditions are especially vulnerable. By visiting the Whatcom Museum you, and all members of your group, voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Crow standing on a rock

Audubon: Do Crows Have Language?

Join the North Cascades Audubon Society for their monthly program in the Rotunda Room of Old City Hall. The Audubon will offer both an in-person event, as well as a virtual option. Like humans, crows are smart, social, and make a variety of interesting vocalizations, but do they have a language like us?

In this talk, Douglas Wacker will discuss research on crow calling behavior that he’s conducted with undergraduates at the University of Washington Bothell. He’ll introduce the crows that roost near the campus, explore crow vocal communication, and discuss how their vocalizations compare with human language.

$5 suggested donation/members free

In-person programs in the Rotunda Room of Old City Hall will have distanced seating with a maximum capacity of 60 people on a first come, first serve basis. We will also provide a link to our livestreamed program for viewing offsite. Masks will be required for all participants regardless of vaccination status. If you feel unwell or have any symptoms of illness, please tune in virtually to our programs.

The Audubon will require proof of vaccination to attend this program. Please bring your vaccination card or a photo of it.

 

COVID-19 Disclaimer: While the Whatcom Museum has implemented rigorous protocols to maintain a clean and safe environment, an inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. COVID-19 is a very contagious disease that can lead to severe illness and death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, senior citizens and visitors with underlying medical conditions are especially vulnerable. By visiting the Whatcom Museum you, and all members of your group, voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19.

Photo: Jose Manuel Gelpi via Canva


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Stuffed owls in bird exhibit

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

A volunteer from the North Cascades Audubon Society will be on hand in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to answer questions about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and the importance of studying bird specimens today. All ages welcome.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.

Stuffed owls in bird exhibit

Fourth Sundays: Audubon at the Museum

A volunteer from the North Cascades Audubon Society will be on hand in the John M. Edson Hall of Birds to answer questions about migration, conservation, birds in peril, and the importance of studying bird specimens today. All ages welcome.

Check our website to see current hours of operation or for potential closures due to COVID-19 restrictions.


The Whatcom Museum acknowledges that we gather on the traditional territory of the Lhaq’temish – Lummi People – and the Nuxwsá7aq – Nooksack People – who have lived in the Coast Salish region from time immemorial. The Museum honors our relationship with all of our Coast Salish neighbors and our shared responsibilities to their homeland where we all reside today.